GFCI Legislation Impacts – What You Need to Know
Install new GFCI electrical outlet today

Today, parts like GFCI outlets have test and reset buttons. A user can push these to test proper function or reset a circuit after it trips.

The properties you work on won’t always be up to code, and it’s your job to get them there. In many cases, this will require a lot of electrical work. Older wiring can pose a real injury hazard even if it looks fine. Tenants may get shocked without warning. The only thing that should shock your tenants is how well maintained your property is, so it’s best to upgrade as soon as possible.

Using GFCI outlets is a common way to take care of these problems quickly. Since you don’t need to rewire major parts or drop new wires, it’s very convenient. However, in June of 2015 the GFCI electrical rules are going to change. If you don’t want to get hurt or be written up, you need to pay attention to the parts that you use.

Let’s start with some basics – why use electrical GFCI devices? Ground-fault circuit interrupter, or GFCI, parts have their own mini breakers and sensors. They can trip automatically when they detect mismatched electrical current between the supply line and a load. These electrical outlets are perfect for high-risk areas. You’ve likely seen them in bathrooms, kitchens, laundry rooms, and other zones where water is present.

The Current Electrical GFCI Laws- GFCI legislation varies by location. Still, most U.S. laws rely on rules created by Underwriters Laboratories, or UL. Maintenance workers should be aware of UL 943 Standard for Ground-Fault Circuit Interrupters. This standard lays down the basic ground rules for Class A parts used in power circuits. Class A parts are usually found in residences, offices, stores, and industrial areas.

What’s Changing? On June 29, 2015, however, the UL 943 rules changed requiring an update. UL wants to improve the way GFCI electrical protection works, and it will use two methods to do so. The new code says that new GFCI parts should have:

GFCI Electrical Outlet

1. Auto-Monitor Self-Testing- Today, parts like GFCI outlets have test and reset buttons. A user can push these to test proper function or reset a circuit after it trips. New parts will also need to have automatic monitoring. This function checks whether the fault detection is working. It can trip the breaker when things malfunction inside a part, and it activates itself.

2. Power Denial End-of-Life Features- All GFCI outlets eventually reach the end of their useful life. At such time, their fault protection may also stop working. Power denial features are made to lock these dangerous outlets. A locked outlet can’t supply current. It also can’t be reset by a user, so it’s far safer.

Do I Need to Replace Old GFCI Components?

The new GFCI legislation only counts for parts built after the June 2015 deadline. Properties can keep using outlets that were made earlier. It’s also fine to install old outlets you already bought. The main difference is that new parts you buy after this date must have the two extra “auto-monitor self-testing” and “power denial end-of-life” features.

So, time to ask yourself, are your electrical parts up to code, or is it time for a safety upgrade? Visit HD Supply Facilities Maintenance online to learn more about your hardware options.

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Want to lean more about GFCI Legislation?

Click here to learn more about GFCI Legislation and how you could be affected.

There are 24 comments so far

  • Kenneth Foster
    2 years ago

    GFCI stand for Ground Fault Ciruit Interrupter

  • Kenneth Foster
    2 years ago

    GFCI stand for

    GROUND
    FAULT
    CIRUIT
    INTERRUPTER

  • Gertrudes Cruz
    2 years ago

    GFCI stands for Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter wich means that the receptacle can be reset when it tripps or stops working.

  • Kenneth Helberg
    2 years ago

    Ground Fault Circuit Interrupt great article!

  • Carla weaver
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter

  • Alex Suzzi
    2 years ago

    Ground
    Fault
    Circuit
    interrupter

  • Chad varner
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter.

  • Heather
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter

  • Bud Fox
    2 years ago

    Gfci means ground fault circuit interupter

  • rich garcia
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interupter

  • Manuel Alberto Delgado
    2 years ago

    GFCI – GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER

  • Kyle Moore
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter

  • Rich
    2 years ago

    GFCI stands for Ground-fault circuit interrupter

  • John Habermehl
    2 years ago

    GFCI – GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTER ,

  • Sean lore
    2 years ago

    GFCI is the abbreviation for: Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter

  • Fred Thompson
    2 years ago

    Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter

  • Brian Ray
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter

  • Andres gimenez
    2 years ago

    Gfci is a ground fault circuit interruptor what it means is the in a regular day of work or cooking and using this devices will make our lifes secured . Why cause the fault act in a matter of miliseconds to desactived the main power source of electricity . People use devices with a short cut and defaulty conections and because of the GFCI our lifes are more secured . Tks and happy cristmas.

  • Brandi
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter

  • Jon seidner
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter

  • Ben Garcia
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interruptor

  • Kori wagner
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter

  • Mike Greene
    2 years ago

    Ground fault circuit interrupter

  • Casey mcdonald
    2 years ago

    Gfci- stands for “Ground Fault Circuit Interupter”

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